Agreements Made At The Berlin Conference

The conference was convened on Saturday, November 15, 1884 at bismarck`s headquarters on Wilhelmstrasse. The main dominant powers in the conference were France, Germany, Britain and Portugal. They re-mapped Africa without taking into account the cultural and linguistic boundaries already defined. At the end of the conference, Africa was divided into 50 colonies. Facilitators determined who had control of each of these new services. They also planned, without any commitment, to put an end to the slave trade in Africa. The Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, also known as the Congolese Conference or Conference on West Africa,[1] regulated European colonization and trade in Africa during the period of New Imperialism and coincided with the sudden rise of Germany as an imperial power. The conference was organised by Otto von Bismarck, Germany`s first Chancellor. Its outcome, the general act of the Berlin conference, can be seen as a formalization of the Scramble for Africa, but some historians warn against the emphasis on its role in the colonial division of Africa and draw attention to the bilateral agreements reached before and after the conference. [2] [3] The conference helped launch a period of enhanced colonial activities by European powers that eliminated or oversized most of the existing forms of African autonomy and autonomy. [4] The conference was an opportunity to lead latent European hostilities; to create new areas to help the European powers develop in the face of growing American, Russian and Japanese interests; and to have a constructive dialogue to limit future hostilities. In Africa, colonialism was introduced on almost the entire continent.

When African independence was regained after World War II, it was in the form of fragmented states. [20] Historians have long marked the Berlin conference when formalizing the Scramble for Africa,[22] but recent research has questioned the legal and economic implications of the conference. [3] The conference proposed by Portugal in pursuit of its particular claim to control the mouth of the Congo was necessitable by the jealousy and distrust with which the great European powers viewed attempts at colonial expansion in Africa. The General Act of the Berlin Conference declared the Congo Basin neutral (a fact that in no way prevented the Allies from extending the War I World War to this territory); Guaranteed freedom of trade and navigation for all States in the basin; prohibits the slave trade; and rejected Portugal`s claims to the mouth of the Congo – thus allowing the creation of the Congo Free State, which Britain, France and Germany had already approved in principle. . . .